Monday, August 27, 2012

Taphophile Tragics # 36


Point Clare Cemetery, maintained and controlled by Gosford City Council about an hour and a bit north of Sydney, would have to be the most organised cemetery I have ever meandered. Not only are there two large maps, one of them being at the entrance, seen here, but there are also stumpy black markers on all the Sections and Rows. I was looking for Anglican Section 8, Row 1, Lots 3 & 4. My own Taphophile post will spin you the yarn.


Point Clare Cemetery 'serves' a working class area, that must be predomninantly Protestant going on the allocation of the Sections among the religions. It has a most beautiful location, backing into the bush as it does, with the clear call of the Bell Bird resounding across the grounds. It also has not one, but three, sections labelled 'Still Born'. I will come to this in the weeks ahead - and promise to give you plenty of warning.

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Welcome to the 36th week of Taphophile Tragics.

Your contribution is most welcome. Please ensure that you include some details of the cemetery in which you took your photographs, and link directly to your post, rather than simply to your blog in general. This week, Mr Linky opens at 9:30pm Monday, Sydney time (GMT+10), and closes at 9:30pm on the Friday. When you can, please visit the other contributing bloggers to show your appreciation of their endeavours. Due to time zone variations and overcrowded schedules, some contributions are made later than Tuesday/Wednesday. As per usual, we are working with the Linky with thumbnails, and displaying the oldest entry first, with no randomising.

10 comments:

JM said...

The middle shot show us a fantastic background for this cemetery.

Gemma Wiseman said...

I have not seen a map at a cemetery entrance before! Great idea! And the Gosford Cemetery looks as if it is in a delightful bushland setting! Love the atmosphere of light and shadow in the first photo!

Julie said...

This is only a very small cemetery, for a specific community. My paternal great-grandmother was interred there in 1919, as well as my maternal grandmother in 1952. I must live in a very small constellation.

marbletowns said...

Really interesting! I also think it's unusual (and very nice) to have a map near the entrance.

And thanks for letting me participate! :)

Julie said...

Indeed, it is an absolute pleasure to have you participate!

Nicola Carpenter said...

Fantastic pictures. Very organised. Nothing like the ones I visit were you're given a secton, row and grave number and you had to simply guess where it might be with the help of a very vague map.

Beneath Thy Feet

hamilton said...

we often have maps at the entrance of our larger cemeteries - but they often are very vague, too!
having plots laid out in rows would make it much easier to find a specific resting place.

Kathy said...

We have some rural cemeteries like this one that border on woods. They're especially beautiful in the fall of the year when the leaves turn. One thing I've noticed about the Australian cemeteries is that the graves are so close together compared to the cemeteries we have here in Texas. I suppose as our numbers increase, space becomes more important and more limited. I'll opt for cremation in order not to take up space that others may need for living or growth of food. Thank you for hosting this wonderful meme.

CaT said...

time to sleep, we went to the cinema and now its late.... :)

Mariusz from Nowy Sacz said...

Julie, unusual, absolutely amazing blog ...
I wish you a happy life in the New Year!

ps. Sydney Eye is lovely :)