Monday, April 23, 2012

Taphophile Tragics # 18

Let me introduce you to QR codes. I thank Gene from Oakland for alerting me to them. They were all over the media last week, even here in Australia. However, in my usual head-in-the-sand way, I went blithely on my ignorant way, until Gene's comment.

A Quick Response code is the trademark for a type of matrix barcode first designed for the automotive industry. Now, the system has become popular because of its fast readability and large storage capacity compared to standard UPC barcodes. The code consists of black modules (square dots) arranged in a square pattern on a white background. Here are some examples:



However, what if a QR code were attached to a headstone ... would that help us keep in touch ... but perhaps watch the video ...

15 comments:

Sondra said...

WOW this is amazing, and what a great IDEA, makes research a SNAP eh!! I do believe the QR stamp should also be cataloged in a safe place also as weather will eventually take its toll on that little square stamp.

JM said...

Julie, I'm amazed! Thank you so much for the video, haven't heard of this before. My first thought was this is totally - how shall I put it? - 'over the top', but I have to think about it later to make a better judgement, I guess. Fantastic post!

Francisca said...

Julie, technical blips prevent me from seeing the video now. As was once famously said, I will be back.

Clueless in Boston said...

Thanks Julie. Interesting use of QR Codes. I guess now anyone can speak form the "beyond," no Ouija Board or medium needed, just a smartphone.

hamilton said...

This would certainly make research much easier!
but at the same time, I find it a little cheesy. maybe I am just old fashioned.

Julie said...

Hamilton: I felt sure this innovation would divide our regular posters. I am in two minds about it. I think it is a splendid use of technology, but I enjoy the thrill of the research chase.

NixBlog said...

Great video, Julie. Amazing how technology is transforming our life (and now it seems, also our death!)...

Thank you for hosting.

The Paw Relations said...

How interesting! I love the thought of being able to leave a message behind, preferably a rude one.

Herding Cats

http://seathreepeeo.blogspot.co.uk

Julie said...

Would be even better if it worked like a ouija board ...

Joe said...

Have to make sure the QR plaque is secured firmly. Perhaps it could include a GPS so if it becomes separated from our dearly departed future generations can return it to its rightful owner.

Francisca said...

Hmmm... I think I join you in being of two minds, Julie. I'm quick to embrace new technology and put up a website for my mother when she died two years ago as we have family all over the globe. Still, do each and every one of us have a story worth retelling? Maybe yes; from an anthrolopogical point of view. Still, like hamilton, a small part of me recoils... maybe it's the sales pitch and the pitch of her voice that is cheesy. :-)

Sondra said...

Julie, my thumbnail wouldnt work so I ended up with the strange little Linky Icon! lol

Julie said...

All better!

Ann said...

Oh goodness. Now you can stay wired even after death. Not sure what I think about this. Part of me is screaming No! but I can see the attraction for the family. It would take all the fun out of research.

CaT said...

i think it is an amazing idea. the other day i was discussing with tim what i thought would be the future of cemeteries. i thought it would move to the internet, somehow.
but this is way better. because just the internet, is just not enough...
a really great idea, and its up to you and/or your family whether you do it or not. in this way, you yourself can sort of decide what will be left behind from you, and maybe its somehow a good thought that not everything you did disappears when you die; there are still some traces people can find, of stuff you want to show... (like a link to your blog, haha)