Monday, March 5, 2012

Taphophile Tragics # 11


Funerary masons would have to be the most self-effacing tradies around.

This is the quality of lead I am working with: Hanson & Co. But I have others: Spurson, A E Anderson, H Johnson. All these are from my field trip through Waverley Cemetery last month. There were other names - like Charles Kinsela, and Walter Carter - but I know these to be undertakers not creators of funerary art.

There are so many gorgeous statues in Waverley Cemetery. There must be a clue to unlocking their secrets.

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Welcome to the 11th week of Taphophile Tragics.

Your contribution is most welcome. Please ensure that you include some details of the cemetery in which you took your photographs. Please link directly to your post, rather than simply to your blog in general. Mr Linky opens at 10pm Monday, Sydney time (GMT+11). When you can, please visit the other contributing bloggers to show your appreciation of their endeavours. Due to time zone variations and overcrowded schedules, some contributions are made later than Tuesday/Wednesday.

21 comments:

JM said...

Another wonderful composition, Julie!

RoeH said...

Love it. I went through another pioneer cemetery outside of Phoenix last week. Historically, the Sonoran Desert of Arizona really does cemeteries differently because of the lack of water. I'll be posting pictures soon.

Julie said...

Thanks, Jose. I come for a visit in a couple of minutes.

Thanks, Roe. I look forward to reading it.

Theanne said...

old cemeteries...a repository of our history!

Gemma Wiseman said...

Funerary art knows no trend. Style seems to be a combination of creator and those for whom it is created! Always fascinating!

Halcyon said...

I linked to an old post today. I love cemeteries and you post an interesting question today. I have never taken the time to see if the statues, etc. are signed. I will look for this the next time I'm on a cemetery walk!

Joe said...

Hi Julie
Linked to Squizzy Taylor today. I have a few more which you might be interested in.

NixBlog said...

Hi Julie, nice shot! Funerary art is quite an amazing topic and one can find quite spectacular sculptures in cemeteries. See my post for some of these in the Athens Cemetery, one particularly rich in shining white marble statuary.

Julie said...

One of the things I am trying to sort out too, Nick, is when individual sculptures from marble or granite, gave way to moulds poured from polyresins. Who were the masons who hard-carved individual statues, and is their 'art' identifiable and able to be collated?

Sondra said...

There are some really lovely works of art in cemeteries...It would be awesome if one could find a signed work!! I LOVE the iron fences and most especially the really old pieces. REALLY like the one you have pictured with the fleur de'lis on top!!

Jim said...

I have shared one of those Waverley Cemetery statues today.

Joan Elizabeth said...

Something to keep your sleuthing mind active. I guess they don't have a website, having long passed on but maybe there will be an old advert somewhere.

Julie said...

Joan: I am going the Trove route.

The Paw Relations said...

What a fantastic picture. I find Google is always the best place to start, with local libraries and old local trade directories a close second.

Herding Cats

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Oakland Daily Photo said...

Your post today is sending me back to Mt. View to look for signatures on either headstones or statuary. A new quest of sorts.

Deb said...

Nice shot and good luck in your quest. Monumental masons sometimes have a workshop in cemeteries over here. They can be very informative about the history of their firm especially if it has stayed in the family.

CaT said...

do you like to read?
im curious how many of the authors you have read in my post! i have to admit i read none of them. i do have some of their books. "to be read". some day...

i always wonder about those "caged" graves. i dont think i want a cage around my grave...

Owen said...

So many unknown stone cutters, sculptors, glass workers, masons, iron forgers behind all the monuments and art in cemeteries. Often sculptures in French cemeteries are signed, but very hard to track down any info about the names that can be found. And I would wager that they have become a very rare breed indeed.

imho, the quality of the work being done in many places today just doesn't hold a candle against what was being done a hundred years ago. I never go near the recent areas of most graveyards, the cold, polished, square-cut slabs of marble or granite don't appeal to me at all, I wouldn't want to spend eternity underneath such a soul-less piece of stone.

Julie said...

Could not agree with you more, Owen. On the disappearing tradesmen, and the slabs of granite et al.

It is the old style markers that interest me. The one's that others have forgotten.

diane b said...

They are an overlooked bunch of artists.Sorry no pics this week.

Julie said...

S'okay. Simply join back in when you have material you are happy with.